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Just One Click Away (Must watch video) 6min

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlnYrsZ7r-8[/youtube]

The Fish Wish (poem by C Brian Borg)

The Fish Wish.

For an ordinary man with a holiday plan,
thought he’d head to the beach for a week.
with his son by his side, the mans joy and his pride,
A fish dinner to catch they will seek.

To be a good dad, is the plan the man had,
and to teach his young son how to fish.
Rod, line and then hook, he taught by the book,
he then said, not a prayer but a wish.

I wish for the weather to hold us together,
and no waves will come crashing inside.
I wish there no snags, old boots or no rags,
be washed to our hooks by the tide.

I wish the line strong for the fish to jump on,
knots, tangles and nests there are none.
I wish for my boy, this rod be a toy,
then all day he will think this is fun.

I wish us to catch, not one but a batch,
to kiss and put back where they came.
I wish this to be, our day at the sea,
where no fish that are caught are the same.

I wish that my boy will always enjoy,
the memories that are had here today.
and I wish most of all, my son has a ball,
when the big one does not get away.

The man then stopped wishing.
“its time to start fishing” he said to his son with a grin.
“I think it is time for these fish to be mine,
and now let the fishing begin”.

Time after time they’d drop in their line,
the fish didn’t seem to be there.
they’d bring up the hook, just for a look,
the cooler they brought was still bare.

“I’m sorry my son, we didn’t catch one,
I don’t know what I must say.
maybe the bad bait, or the tide was too late,
but now we must call it a day”.

The man could not hide, the joy or the pride,
or the tear that was happy not sad.

“Today it was fun”, said the mans only son.
“Cause my wish was to just be with you, DAD”.

C Brian Borg 2000

Is Gambling Sinful? (by Geoff Ashley The Village Church)

Is Gambling Sinful?

SUMMARY: We are called to eat and drink and do all things to the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31). If you choose to exert the freedom to gamble, you are called to do so in a manner which is in subjection to this command. Is gambling or another “gray area” a means for worship? If so, then engage in it to the glory of the Lord. If not, then happily refrain.

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In all areas where the Scripture does not explicitly condemn or condone an activity, we hope to apply the principle of Christian liberty. This is true in watching certain movies (whether rated R or not), drinking alcohol, smoking and gambling, just to name a few of the more common historic hot-button issues.

As in each of these areas, there is a theological approach which can be quite simple. If someone asks whether or not gambling is explicitly condemned as being sinful, one could answer “no” and this would be accurate. However, we think that a better and more faithful answer would be “not necessarily.”

As pastors, our desire is not only to awaken our people to the liberties of the Christian life, but also to the dangers. It is definitely true that we would be best served to refrain from some things which are not inherently evil. 1 Corinthians 6 and 10 both say, in effect, that “all things are permissible, but not all things are profitable.” Now, these passages are in reference to issues

of conscience, those “gray areas” of the Christian life, so don’t take this verse to mean that adultery or murder or drunkenness or other explicitly condemned behaviors are included in
the “all things” which Paul mentions. Those things are not “permissible.”

The fact is that the wise man or woman recognizes that with freedom comes the need to be discerning. Is a certain behavior pure and pleasing to the Lord? Does it stir one’s affections for Him? Will it lead toward particular temptations?

Gambling in and of itself is a gray area within the context of Scripture and thus there is freedom to partake. However, one should be aware of the addictive nature of the activity, the tendency to instill false hope, the advantage it takes of others and the propensity toward a lust for money.

As believers, we are called to “keep [our lives] free from love of money, and be content with what [we] have, for he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” (Hebrews 13:5). Gambling can certainly contribute to a thirst for money which is disobedient to this command of Scripture.

In addition, after quoting “all things are permissible” the Scripture says “but I will not be enslaved by anything” (1 Corinthians 6:12). After the second use in chapter 10, it is followed by these words, “Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor.” Is it possible for you to gamble in such a way as to not be enslaved by it? Can you do it in such a way that you do not damage another? If not, then your “right” must be replaced by your responsibility to adhere to God’s revealed will.

Our hope is not to prohibit gambling, but rather to promote
deep reflection as to the risks. As the Scripture says, “do
not be deceived.” Search yourself to know your desires and weaknesses. Examine your motives. Do not take liberty lightly!

At the end of the day, we are called to eat and drink and do all things to the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31). If you choose to exert the freedom to gamble, you are called to do so in a manner which is in subjection to this command. Is gambling or another “gray area” a means for worship? If so, then engage in it to the glory of the Lord. If not, then happily refrain.

Your greatest joy is ultimately not found in hitting a jackpot or flopping a nut straight (for those who choose to play hold ‘em), but in obeying the Lord Who Himself is our treasure.

Geoff Ashley
The Village Church

Defining Masculinity (sermon Matt Chandler The Village Church)

Follow the link bellow to listen to a sermon from “The Village Church” Pastor Matt Chandler

It has some great content well worth the investment of 37 min

http://www.thevillagechurch.net/sermon/defining-masculinity/

What is Complementarianism? (by Geoff Ashley of the village church)

 

What is Complementarianism?

SUMMARY: While being absolutely equal in personhood and dignity, man and woman are distinct in their roles in the home and church. This position is to be distinguished from both ancient patriarchy that often neglects the equality of the sexes and egalitarianism which neglects the clear Scriptural role distinctions

God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them.Genesis 1:27

The Village Church is complementarian in our understanding of manhood and womanhood.1 To put it most succinctly, we believe that while being absolutely equal in personhood and dignity, man and woman are distinct in regards to roles in the home and church. This position is to be distinguished from both ancient patriarchy which often neglects the equality of the sexes and egalitarianism which neglects the clear Scriptural role distinctions.

Scripture dedicates much space to the affirmation of the equality of men and women in regards to worth, nature and substance. This means that man and woman are essentially, naturally and substantially equal before God and each other. Any interpretation of the biblical text must be free from misogyny or unwarranted and naïve assumptions of male dominance or superiority. This is made clear in such passages as:

Although man and woman are equal, it is not true that there are no commanded role distinctions. Rather, the Scriptures teach that we each have proper roles in the home and church. It is our belief that confusion of these roles will result not only in a sinful application of the biblical text, but, consequently, the loss of joy in our pursuit of Christ.

Distinction within the home revolves around the idea of the headship of a man over his wife. This headship is not to be exercised as dominating and oppressive authority, but rather servant leadership. Such a pattern is seen in the following passages:

The husband is called to serve and sacrifice for his wife as an expression of his love for her. At the same time, the wife is called to submit to and respect her husband as an expression of her love for him. In this way they complement each other. Though equal, they have distinct roles in their homes.

Likewise, man and woman have some level of distinction within the context of the church. The texts upon which these distinctions are based include:

As we understand the issue, there are certain contexts in which women are not allowed to teach (1 Timothy 2:12). This prohibition cannot be universal however as Paul specifically calls for older women to teach younger (Titus 2:3-4). Indeed, we even have an example of a woman teaching a man in the story of Priscilla and Apollos (Acts 18:26).

In addition to the above, we also recognize that women are not to be put into the positions of ultimate authority within the context of the local church. As we are elder-led, we therefore restrict eldership to males who meet all of the pertinent qualifications (1 Timothy 3, Titus 1).

Though space will not allow for us to address all of the concerns related to this issue, we would like to comment briefly on the position which claims that all of the Scriptural role distinctions are cultural in nature. According to this interpretation, any alleged distinctions in the text are merely a result of or concession to the surrounding patriarchal culture. Therefore, as times and cultural mores change, so should our application of the relevant Scriptures.

In response, it is interesting to note that the divinely inspired authors of Scripture do not argue from the perspective of culture. Rather, they argue for role distinctions on the basis of Christ’s relationship to the Father (1 Corinthians 11:3), His relationship to the church (Ephesians 5:22-25), creation (1 Timothy 2:12- 131 Corinthians 11:8-9), the fall (1 Timothy 2:14) and law (1 Corinthians 14:34). Suffice to say that such grounds for Paul’s argument go well beyond the cultural bias position. The distinctions in role are grounded in who we were created to be and who we are and are a reflection of our relationship to our Creator.

Given this very brief overview of complementarian theology, it behooves the reader to familiarize him or her self with the material presented in the various supplemental materials mentioned above if they have any questions.

© 2007 The Village Church. All rights reserved.


Footnotes

1 See also the teachings and “The Role of Women” by Matt Chandler and “A Theology of Manhood and Womanhood” by Geoff Ashley.

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